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Here is an artist who believes in the power of the people. He believes in the power of community to change their own standard of living, and in the power of the collective to transform the world into a better place. What he doesn’t believe in is governments, which he views as essentially corrupt, stating that in his mind, governments, institutions and businesses only seek to get rich off of the labors of others and will not lift a hand to help individuals or communities.

Gonzalo Areúz lives and paints in Tenochtitlán in Mexico. His art is heavily influenced by the ancient tribal art of Mexico and he takes a lot of inspiration from Mayan art and Aztec art. He combines the ancient art forms with the modern art form of graffiti to create a style that is timeless while also being attractive to the modern eye. In a way, Areúz is renewing an ancient tradition of street art in Mexico, because the ancient Aztec art was carved into stones that were set along the streets in the sides of buildings. The only real difference is that Areúz uses paint instead of stone carving. The finished result is so beautiful that his ancestors would be proud.

His street art murals are generally huge, covering several storeys of a building. Creating a painting at such a large scale requires patience and a buttload of scaffolding. And a lot of paint. Areúz favors spray paint for creating his wall art, a medium that is a favorite of most graffiti and street artists.

You can follow Gonzalo Areúz on Facebook to get updates of his new pieces.

This detail shot of one of Gonzalo Areúz’s street art murals shows how the artist has used patterns from traditional Mexican weaving and Aztec art. Mexican tribal art was carved into stone which was then set into the walls of the ancient Mayan cities. In a way, Areúz is creating his very own Mexican Renaissance in which he is giving new life to the beautiful art forms from ancient Mexico. [source]

 

Areúz has covered the side of this big building with a street art mural that depicts animals, men and spirits in the ancient Mayan art style

Areúz has covered the side of this big building with a street art mural that depicts animals, men and spirits in the ancient Aztec art style. In the heart shape between the two men’s heads is a painting of a galaxy. Many people believe that the ancient Mexicans had connections in the greater universe that are lost to us today. In art, celestial scenes are symbolic of spirituality and godliness. [source]

Gonzalo Areúz has painted a depiction of a spirit called Tlalli in this street art mural in Mexico

Gonzalo Areúz has painted a depiction of a spirit called Tlalli in this street art mural in Mexico. Tlalli is the God who is responsible for the life and death cycle that constantly renews and replenishes the earth. From the earth, flowers and fruits grow, but when they die, they return to the earth, giving their nutrients back to the soil so that other fruits and flowers may flourish. This colorful wall art uses flowering vines to represent this cycle. The vines climb over the statuesque god as he poses in a way that is reminiscent of ancient Mayan and Aztec art. [source]

 

Creatures of the Mexican rainforest coexist with mankind in this large and colorful street art mural by Areúz

Creatures of the Mexican rainforest coexist with mankind in this large and colorful street art mural by Areúz. The parrots, iguanas, snakes and fish of Mexico are often brightly colored which make them a perfect addition for this colorful mural. The meaning of this painting is that human beings can live alongside their animal brethren in peace, without destroying the habitats of animals and without killing the animals. [source]

 

Beautiful creatures and plants spring forth from the chest of an eco warrior in this street art mural painted by Gonzalo Areúz

Beautiful creatures and plants spring forth from the chest of an eco warrior in this street art mural painted by Gonzalo Areúz. Butterflies are a symbol of rebirth and renewal. In this painting, the artist is saying that it’s not too late for mankind to change its relationship with nature. [source]

 

This street art mural by Gonzalo Areúz shows Xiuhcoatl, the fire serpent in Aztec mythology

This street art mural by Gonzalo Areúz shows Xiuhcoatl, the fire serpent in Aztec mythology. The fire serpent is the spirit form of the Aztec fire god Xiuhtecuhtli. [source]

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By: Streets on Art